This is an attempt to document my adventures through life.

Basics about Ro

Lesbian living in San Francisco

Loves

-Fixie Bicycles
-Photography
-Buddhism
-Da Bears Da Bears Da Bears
-San Francisco Giants
-Interesting Individuals
-My wonderful girlfriend
-Independent & Foreign Films

*Undocumented & Unafraid*

-If you don't like gays, immigrants or common sense this is not the page for you

 

samcirca:

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

I’ve seen one in person, and these are pretty badass. 

samcirca:

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

I’ve seen one in person, and these are pretty badass. 

(Source: fightingforanimals)

yellowxperil:

San Francisco Chinese Restaurant Temporarily Closes Because White Gentrifiers are Annoying and Entitled

A series of customer complaints angered the chef-owner of the small Chinese restaurant so much that he chose to shut the doors, albeit, temporarily, SF Eater reports.

“We are closed because of you (customers),” one sign read.

“So…yes we use MSG, we don’t believe in organic food, and we don’t give a shit about gluten free,” a sign directly below the first proclaims.

The chef tells KGO-TV that he made the signs because he was tired of catering too hard to satisfy patrons.

To illustrate his frustration, he explained one of the incidents that led to the closure:

“The second guy came up to me and said, ‘The rule is, if we don’t like it we don’t have to pay.’ And as he walked out he started cursing at me and that’s when I went ‘poof’,” the chef says.

An employee with the restaurant told the SF Eater that another incident occurred just prior. In that case, the party refused to pay for their meals after saying the food was “too spicy.”

(To quickly address the stigmatization of MSG- it is racist bullshit)

"I think I’m surprisingly different in real life than what people expect or what people project on to me. I’m not actually that awkward, I don’t think. I think people see me as this sarcastic person that doesn’t care about anything. But, on the contrary, I’m pretty emotional and sensitive and I care a lot about things and people. I think in moments where the spotlight is on me — like if I’m doing a talk show — my defenses come into play and maybe that’s why people see me that way. But, I think my sarcasm is often a way for me to get through those moments. I mean, if you came over to my house, I’d make you a cup of tea and be probably really interested in you."

 - Aubrey Plaza for Refinery29 [x]

(Source: inaturdishmanner)

baremidriffs7:

positlvedreamer:

baremidriffs7:

don’t say nigga if you’re not black it’s very simple

and AND don’t say cracker if you’re not white… etc

overall just don’t be rude

Look Becky you need to just not comment on my posts saying irrelevant and stupid things.  thanks and God bless

Crackers are so fucking delicious

18mr:

Fast food workers struggling for a wage of $15 an hour and the right to unionize participated in a nonviolent civil disobedience action last week. 

This is Emily Nguyen (ponytail) and Kalia Vang (visor). Emily is 20 years-old and a sophomore at Sacramento City College. She’s worked in fast food for a year and a half and makes California minimum wage ($9 an hour). She says, “I’m just working to breathe, to stay alive. I’m not really living life. We won’t stop till we meet our destination, till our wages go up.”

 Watch the emotional video of their arrest here, and be sure to support them on Facebook here!